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Charter 2014


Introduction

Education Act 1989, Sections 75 and 76

s.75 Functions and Powers of Boards –

(1) A school's board must perform its functions and exercise its powers in such a way as to ensure that every student at the school is able to attain his or her highest possible standard in educational achievement.
(2) Except to the extent that any enactment or the general law of New Zealand provides otherwise, a school's board has complete discretion to control the management of the school as it thinks fit.

s.76 Principals –

(1) A school’s principal is the board’s chief executive in relation to the school’s control and management.
(2) Except to the extent that any enactment or the general law of New Zealand provides otherwise, the principal –
Shall comply with the board’s general policy directions; and
Subject to paragraph (a) of this subsection, has complete discretion to manage as the principal thinks fit the school’s day to day administration.

Governance

  • The Kaikohe East School board emphasises strategic leadership rather than administrative detail, has a clear distinction between board and staff roles, concentrates on the future rather than the past or present, and is pro-active rather than reactive.

Management

  • The board delegates all authority and accountability for the day-to-day operational organisation of the school to the principal.

The School and its Community

  • Kaikohe East School teaches children from Year 0 to Year 6.  All students are taught the New Zealand National Curriculum.
  • The school provides high quality educational opportunities for its students.
  • The school is pleasantly sited and well resourced.  Staff, board members, and parents are very supportive of the work of the school.
  • Kaikohe East School has a number of sporting resources (swimming pool, playing fields, sealed court areas and two adventure playgrounds).

National Education Priorities

  • Kaikohe East School recognizes the government’s National Education Priorities:
  • The school integrates the National Educational Goals at governance and operational levels by giving them full consideration when planning school developments or school/class programmes.

Cultural Diversity

  • The Board takes all reasonable steps to provide instruction in Tikanga Maori (Maori culture) and Te Reo Maori (Maori language). 
  • When developing policies and practices for the school every endeavour is made to reflect New Zealand Cultural diversity and the unique position of Maori culture.

Te Reo

  • Parents may choose to enrol their children in the General classes, or the Bilingual classes.  
  • The General classes have all their instruction in English. They also have some Maori Language instruction covering simple commands and greetings, and basic pronunciation. 
  • Bilingual classes have 51-80% of their instruction in Maori. 
  • Teacher Aides with competency in Te Reo are employed to support Bilingual class programmes.  
  • Due to the high proportion of Maori students our school takes the opportunity to support and practise Maori protocol when appropriate and necessary.


Strategic Plan

Vision

To be:

    • Proud of whom they are and where they come from
    • Prepared for and ready to accept challenges
    • Learners now and in the future

Core Values

We value the 4 Cs:

    • Be Considerate
    • Be Courteous
    • Be Cooperative
    • Use your Commonsense

Goals

To create a community of learners with:

    • High Academic achievement in Literacy
    • High Academic achievement in Numeracy

To create a community of Maori learners with:

    • High Academic achievement in Literacy
    • High Academic achievement in Numeracy 

Annual Goal 2014

Focus: Written Language


Strategic Aim

  • To create a community of learners with high academic achievement in writing
  • To create a community of Maori learners with high academic achievement in writing.

Annual Goal for 2014: To improve the percentage of pupils working at and above the National Standards at years 4 and 5.


Rationale


The 2013 National Standards Report  told us:

  • 81% of year 4 pupils are either “below” or “well below” expectations.
  • 82% of year 5 pupils are either “below” or “well below” expectations.
  • More boys than girls are “below” or “well below” (74% compared to 55%) particularly in the “well below” category..
  • In 2013 years 4 and 5 fared worse than other year levels. This is the same trend as we found in 2012.

 

Measurable Target.

  • The percentage of year 4 and 5 pupils assessed as “below” or “well below” will drop to 60% or less by the end of the year.
Actions (what we will do) Outcomes (what we expect to happen)
  • School wide PLD will be provided by Auckland University
  • Walk-throughs will focus on :
    • Modelling books
    • WALTS understood?
    • Books should show progress over the year.
    • Justified grouping takes place
    • Assessment is consistent and reflected in books
  • Walk-throughs will show an improvement in teachers’ pedagogy.
  • Assessment will be moderated
  • All teachers will assess similar work at a similar level.
  • The school timetable will be adjusted so the 9 – 11 am slot is literacy school wide
  • Writing will be taken on a daily basis when appropriate
  • A school-wide spelling programme will be implemented.
  • Spelling will be taken consistently and in a manner that allows children to move from class to class without changing routines.
  • eTap results will be more closely analysed to determine exactly what aspect of writing is hampering achievement (e.g. punctuation, impact, spelling?) and activities to focus on them will be sourced and shared.
  • We will improve pupil achievement in the areas of weakness
  • Each class will have a target group whose progress will be monitored.
  • The target group will make accelerated progress.
  • Teachers will share ideas for motivating writers such as topic choice, presentation or incentives.
  • Children, particularly the boys, will be more motivated to write,

Strategies 2014-2016


2014

2015

2016

Foster te reo me nga tikanga

  • Continue implementation philosophy of Ka Hikitia
  • Most staff take on Piki  nga reo  or Manawa Pou
  • Implement Te Aho Arataki Marau kit e Kura Aoraki
  • Staff meeting opportunity
  • Philosophy for Te Korowai o te Aroha  continues to be developed and spread to other classes
  • Philosophy  of Ka Hikitia becomes integral to the school culture.
  • Te Aho Arataki Marau ki te Kura Aoraki is used across the school
  • Staff meeting opportunity
  • BOT report – Te Reo Maori / Learning Languages
  • Philosophy  of Ka Hikitia becomes integral to the school culture.
  • Te Aho Arataki Marau ki te Kura Aoraki is used across the school
  • Staff meeting opportunity
  • BOT report – Te Reo Maori / Learning Languages

Deliver the curriculum through stimulating, challenging, learner focused and enjoyable programmes

  • A travel budget of around $20k set aside so all classes can go on trips and visits
  • School will enter into exciting programmes and events e.g. Tryathlon, LEARNZ, camps
  • The inquiry approach revisited
  • ICT programmes will be sourced for reading, writing and numeracy.
  • Clubs such as gardening club, kapa haka, unicycling, music club and choir will be run
  • Walkthroughs will identify areas where teachers can make their programmes more exciting
  • Opportunity for sharing of exciting programmes to encourage others to replicate or trial
  • Continue to investigate and develop ideas and programmes gained from Reggio Emilio professional development opportunities
  • The topic focus of school programmes will be revised.
  • The inquiry approach will become an integral part of teaching programmes
  • Continue to investigate and develop ideas and programmes gained from Reggio Emilio professional development opportunities
  • Continue to investigate and develop ideas and programmes gained from Reggio Emilio professional development opportunities
  • Continue EOTC budget so that classes can visit places of interest
  • Continue to be involved in Triathlon events, camps
  • ICT programmes will be sourced for reading, writing and numeracy.
  • Clubs such as gardening club, kapa haka, unicycling, music club and choir will be run
  • Walkthroughs will identify areas where teachers can make their programmes more exciting
  • Opportunity for sharing of exciting programmes to encourage others to replicate or trial

Increased use of Information Communication Technology

  • School budget to provide each class with
  • A set of laptops or desktops

  • Apple TV’s will be installed

  • Listening posts

  • Cameras and/or i.pads

  • Useful peripherals that might be shared between classes e.g. digital microscope, visualiser.

  • Individual ICT goals will be negotiated as appropriate with each teacher and PD will be provided.
  • Effective digital resources will be researched and provided to support literacy and numeracy programmes.
  • The school will keep up to date with developments in ICT as our budget allows.
  • Effective, appropriate resources will be purchased to support all classroom programmes
  • SNUP will be complete
  • The school will keep up to date with developments in ICT as our budget allows.
  • Effective, appropriate resources will be purchased to support all classroom programmes

Ensure the school is staffed and resourced to achieve student’s academic potential

  • Staff member given the responsibility of funding applications expected to result in extra income to be spent on resources
  • Budget of approx $30k is used for curriculum purchases.
  • Curriculum responsibilities shared around teachers to ensure resource needs are appropriate and shared. Teachers also allocated to a particular Curriculum Team
  • Staff member given the responsibility of funding applications expected to result in extra income to be spent on resources
  • Budget of approx $30k is used for curriculum purchases.
  • Staff member given the responsibility of funding applications expected to result in extra income to be spent on resources
  • Budget of approx $30k is used for curriculum purchases.

Ensure quality professional development is provided to support needs

  • Sufficient budgeted for teaching staff development and support staff development.
  • PD identified through walkthroughs 2014 goals, nation-wide initiatives and appraisal meetings.
  • Sufficient budgeted for teaching staff development and support staff development.
  • PD identified through walkthroughs 2014 goals, nation-wide initiatives and appraisal meetings.
  • Sufficient budgeted for teaching staff development and support staff development.
  • PD identified through walkthroughs 2014 goals, nation-wide initiatives and appraisal meetings.

Foster the partnership between the school and the wider community

  • Gala Day
  • Whanau Hui
  • Parent involvement encouraged around:
    • Sports
    • Class support
    • Camps
    • Fund raising
    • Whanau Survey
  • Gala Day
  • Whanau Hui
  • Parent involvement encouraged around:
    • Sports
    • Class support
    • Camps
    • Fund raising
    • Whanau Survey
    • Reading Together - Term 2
    • Clubs programme
  • Gala Day
  • Whanau Hui
  • Parent involvement encouraged around:
    • Sports
    • Class support
    • Camps
    • Fund raising
    • Whanau Survey
    • Reading Together - Term 2
    • Clubs programme


Variance Report 2013

Focus: Reading

Strategic Aim

  • To create a community of learners with high academic achievement in literacy
  • To create a community of Maori learners with high academic achievement in literacy

Annual Aim
  • To raise the percentage of Years 3 and 4 pupils reading at or above the National Standard
  • To raise the percentage of years 3 and 4 Maori pupils reading at or above National Standard

Baseline data: Rationale

The 2012 EOY data told us that:
  • We would start 2013 with 56% of our year 3s and 50% of our year 4s below or well below national standards in reading.
  • Years 5 and 6 were on track with 54% of year 5 and 60.6% of year 6 at or above national standards
  • Unlike writing and maths there seemed to be little difference in the reading levels of genders of year 6 pupils and a very small difference in year 5 pupils

Target: To increase the percentages of year 3 and 4 pupils reading at or above the National Standard by:
  • 10 of the 16 pupils (not counting ORRS funded pupils) assessed at the beginning of 2013 as “well below” will move to “below” or “at”
  • 12 of the 17 pupils (not counting ORRS funded pupils) assessed at the beginning of 2013 as “below” will move to “at”

Actions (what did we do?) Outcomes (what happened?) Reasons for the variance (why did it happen?) Evaluation (where to next?)
  • The RTLit worked with 10pupils and two teachers. 
  • The two teachers were involved in whole day PD with the RTLit each month. 
  • 13 year 3 and 4 pupils were identified as our target group. 
  • 10 year 3 and 4 and 10 year 5 and 6 pupils were also been identified as in need of individual help but many of these are funded through ORRS, LLI, or SES and have IEPs. 
  • Progress of the target group was monitored each term. 
  • 26 year 5 and 6 pupils who are not in our target group of year 3 and 4 but, nonetheless caused us concern were also identified. 
  • The reading recovery tutor was involved in staff meetings with two sessions on running records. (one on taking the test and one on “what next”) 
  • 6 year nets were taken by our SENCO. The collated results will show trends and areas of strength and areas to work on for 2014. 
  • A teacher aid was employed to work with two pupils in reading. 
  • Our SENCO was timetabled to work with two groups of pupils in reading 
  • One teacher and a support staff member took professional development in Language Learning Initiative (LLI). The TA worked in class with three children on the programme. LLI develops oral language in children with low levels of oral language. 
  • Walkthroughs focussed on what was happening with the children in the target group. (planning, appropriateness of activities, grouping, evidence of daily reading, progress etc) 
  • $12500 was been spent on bringing higher interest PM readers at PM levels 3 -8 so we now have 10 copies of each title. 
  • A series of non-fiction high interest books that should appeal to senior boys reading below their age level, was purchased.We purchased copies of Journal Journeys which is a series of books that can make pre-reading and follow-up activities more interesting for children working on School Journals. 
  • Three teachers attended an after-school course on “Discovery Learning” in a move to introduce more exciting language-based activities into their class programmes. ICT spending and support from our ICT person has been targeted at literacy.

We ended 2013 with 37 pupils in year 3. OTJs indicate that:

  • 23 pupils (62%) were above the standard
  • 9 pupils (24%) were at the standard
  • 8 pupils (22%) were below the standard
  • 4 pupils (11%) were well below the standard.

We ended 2013 with 35 pupils in year 4. OTJs indicate that:

  • 10 pupils (29%) were above the standard
  • 6 pupils (17%) were at the standard
  • 11 pupils (31%) were below the standard
  • ·8 pupils (23%) were well below the standard

 

  • 41 of the 72 pupils (57%) were achieving at or above the national standard in reading
  • 19 of the 72 pupils (26%) were below the national standard
  • 12 of the 72 pupils (17%) were well below the national standard
  • While we achieved our goal of increasing the number of pupils reading at or above the NS  the actual target of moving 22 pupils up a level was not reached however the number reading below or well below dropped from 41 pupils to 31 pupils.
  • Pupils in their third year of schooling are expected to make about about 4 PM levels progress. (from 17 to 21) Most of the year 3 pupils who were identified as most in need of help needed to accelerate their progress and lift their reading by 9 to 12 PM Levels and the lowest achievers needed to progress by 14 levels. 
  • Most of the targeted pupils made progress but only by 6 to 9 levels. (The lowest two, who had been on the LLI programme, made no significant progress at all). While this is accelerated progress it still wasn’t enough to catch up. We might have been a bit ambitious in expecting the pupils’ progress to be three times the average. 
  • Pupils in year 4 are expected to end the year on or about PM level 23. Most of the year 4 pupils who were identified as most in need of help needed to accelerate their progress and lift their reading by 9 to 16 PM levels. 
  • All of the Y4 targeted pupils made progress and more than half moved between 6 and 9 levels. Four of the pupils have reached or almost reached the National standard and are in a good position to achieve this in year 5. 
  • Walkthroughs to focus on:
    • Guided reading sessions and questioning
    • Are the WALTS relevant and understood
    • Are post-reading activities such as worksheets relevant to the AO’s.
    • Pupils are grouped appropriately and WALTs are informed by analysis.
    • STAR will be taken in years 3 – 6 and results will give us an understanding of “where to” for comprehension.
    • RTLit will be used more extensively.


Focus: Mathematics

Strategic Aim
  • To create a community of learners with high academic achievement in mathematics
  • To create a community of Maori learners with high academic achievement in mathematics

Annual Aim for 2013
  • To improve the percentage of pupils working above the National Standards at years 2, 4 and 6.

Rationale

The 2012 EOY data told us:
  • We looked at the maths data and noted that 16 pupils (9%) were well below expectations and 63 pupils (36%) were “below”.
  • Well below is recognised as two years behind.
  • 14 of the 16 pupils well below were boys.
  • The biggest group well below were 2012 year 5 pupils (i.e. 2013 year 6) with 25 of these pupils (70%) below or well below.
  • There are no ORRS funded pupils in year 5.
  • There are no pupils in the bi-lingual unit at stage 6.

Measurable Targets: Move some of our pupils from “at” to “above” the National Standards.
  • Of the 22 year 6 pupils assessed as “well below” at the beginning of 2013, 17 will be moved to the “below” or “at” category and of the 33 pupils assessed as “below”, 20 will move to the “at” or “above” category.
  • Children in the te Korowai o Te Aroha will move at a greater rate than pupils in the general classes.

Actions (what did we do?) Outcomes (what happened?) Reasons for the variance (why did it happen?) Evaluation (where to next?)
  • We identified the pupils who we were to target and informed class teachers.
  • Carefully analysed gloss, JAM or NUMPA records to see exactly what specific areas / concepts needed working on
  • We regularly monitored the group’s progress and the planning and implementation of the programme.
  • Walkthroughs focussed on target group
  • Donna to provided professional development in the areas of need.
  • We tried to get a replacement for Sonia trained in ALIM
  • Resources were purchased to compliment classroom programmes
  • ICT, particularly iPad resources that targeted maths were sourced.
  • While there are still no year 6 pupils in the “above” category, the percentage below or well below has dropped from 70% to 34%.
  • The percentage of boys well below or below is now smaller than the girls (33% cv 43%)

  • 4 of the 10 pupils who reached stage 6 were from the bilingual unit.
  • Walkthroughs indicated teacher’s knowledge of the progressions, the stages and pedagogy improved.
  • All children in the class will have benefitted.
  • Feedback and feed forward to staff was effective in improving pedagogy.
  • Walkthroughs showe data usually informed next steps
  • Maths was taken at 5 days per week most weeks in most classes.
  • Modelling books were used in over half the classes and, when used, they reflected the teaching programme
  • Teachers planning and was more explicit
  • Children will showed progress but it was not accelerated.
  • 8 children were selected to receive extra tuition either one on one or in a small group. They all made progress although they started so far behind, they are still rated as “well below”.
  • Resources were better used.
  • Other strands were covered but are rarely reported on or data collated.
  • We think the use of JAM and GLoSS clarified teachers’ understanding of the stages and progression through the stages. This resulted in class programmes with clearer targets.
  • It is understood that Gloss measures strategies and not knowledge. We may need to review the assessment programme so both are covered.
  • We still have concerns around the standard of the other strands of measurement, geometry and statistics which are not covered by the assessment tools.
  • Continue walkthroughs to see improved pedagogy and knowledge is maintained.
  • Investigate assessment tools to cover knowledge and other strands.
  • Train Kaz as an ALIM teacher.
  • Select and give extra help to children in the “needs a push” category.
  • Continue with Donna to oversee school-wide PD


Focus: Written Language

Strategic Aim
  • To create a community of Maori learners with high academic achievement in writing

Annual Aim for 2013 
  • To improve the percentage of pupils working above the National Standards at years 2, 4 and 6.

Baseline data / Rationale
  • The 2012 EOY data told us:
    • 63% of our pupils (108 pupils) were either “below” or “well below” expectations.
    • Twice as many boys as girls were “well below” (24 compared to 11) but there was no significant difference in the “below”, “at” or “above” categories.
    • Pupils in 2012 years 4 and 5 fared worse with 21 year 4 pupils (72%) and 32 year 5 pupils (88%) being below or well below expectations.
    • There were only 2 ORRS funded pupils in year 4 and none in year 5.
Measurable Target
  • Of the 28 pupils assessed as “well below” at the beginning of 2013, 18 will be moved to the “below” or “at” category and of the 54 pupils assessed as “below”, 32 will move to the “at” or “above” category.
  • We will have about 10% of our year 5 and 6 pupils achieving “above” expectations.

Actions (what did we did) Outcomes (what happened?) Reasons for the variance (why did it happen?) Evaluation (where to next?)
  • We identified the pupils who we to target and informed class teachers.
  • We carefully analysed writing samples to see exactly what specific areas / concepts needed working on
  • Through walk-throughs, looking at pupils’ books, looking at teachers’ planning, analysis of eTap data and moderation of samples we monitored
    • The pupils’ progress
    • The planning and implementation of programmes
    • The use of modelling books
    • The appropriateness of topics and means of publication
    • How long and how often children write
  • Place an emphasis in planned staff development meetings on
    • The Writing Hub (TKI)
    • Teaching Writing years 1-3 and years 4-8 (TKI)
    • Effective Literacy Practice
  • Sounds Sense (Down the back of the Chair?)
  • Level 1i is a very wide level so, while most target pupils in years 2 and 3 appear to have made no progress, analysis of their writing shows that all made progress within the stage.
  • 11 of the 19 year 4 and 5 pupils made 1 sub-level improvement (1 pupil made 2)
  • The biggest movement came in year 6 where only 3 pupils made no progress, 3 pupils progressed 1 sub-level, 6 pupils progressed 2 sub-levels and 2 pupils progressed 3 sub-levels or a whole level.
  • Feedback and feed forward to pupils is regular but not always about the WALT
  • Most teachers planning and programmes were more explicit although it was not always possible to tell why the focus had been chosen
  • In most classes an effort was being made to choose topics that were seen as more interesting and engaging, particularly for boys.
  • A variety of publication methods were being used but that varied from class to class and very little was published electronically.
  • Writing appeared to be taken at least 4 days per week in all classes although the amount published in pupils books varied from 5 entries per term to 15.
  • Modelling books were being used in about half the classes. We feel this aspect of language teaching needs to be explored further.
  • Written language PD was held at 5 staff meetings .
  • Possible reasons for us not fully achieving our targets include:
    • A lack of consistency in assessment by curriculum level.
    • Some classes had writing every day but journal type entries appeared to have no writing focus.
    • We have yet to identify which aspects of writing hamper our pupils’ progress. We might be concentrating on structure when we should be concentrating on punctuation or audience awareness.
    • Not all classes provide enough motivation to get our pupils (particularly boys) to write.
    • Most teachers have little variety in presentation formats. 90% of writing is published in the pupils’ books or as a wall story.
  • School wide PLD provided by Auckland University
  • Walk-throughs to focus on :
    • Modelling
    • WALTS understood?
    • Books show progress over the year.
    • Justified grouping takes place
    • Assessment is consistent and reflected in books
  • Assessment will be moderated
  • The school timetable will be adjusted so the 9 – 11 am slot is literacy school wide
  • A school-wide spelling programme will be implemented.
  • eTap results will be more closely analysed to determine exactly what aspect of writing is hampering achievement (e.g. punctuation, impact, spelling?) and activities to focus on them will be sourced and shared.
  • Each class will have a target group whose progress will be monitored.
  • Teachers will share ideas for motivating writers such as topic choice, presentation or incentives.

National Standards Report

Spreadsheet 2013

Reading
Well belowBelowAtAboveTotal
NumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumber
All students3016.6%5429.8%5630.9%4122.7%181
Māori2816.8%4929.3%5130.5%3923.4%167
Male2228.9%2330.3%2228.9%911.8%76
Female87.6%3129.5%3432.4%3230.5%105
Reading
Well belowBelowAtAboveTotal
NumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumber
After 1 year at school211.8%1058.8%15.9%423.5%17
After 2 years at school1028.6%1234.3%617.1%720.0%35
After 3 years at school28.0%520.0%520.0%1352.0%25
End of Year 4721.9%1134.4%412.5%1031.3%32
End of Year 5720.6%617.6%1647.1%514.7%34
End of Year 625.3%1026.3%2463.2%25.3%38
Writing
Well belowBelowAtAboveTotal
NumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumber
All students3921.5%7843.1%5329.3%116.1%181
Māori3722.2%6840.7%5130.5%116.6%167
Male2330.3%3444.7%1925.0%076
Female1615.2%4441.9%3432.4%1110.5%105
Writing
Well belowBelowAtAboveTotal
NumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumber
After 1 year at school15.9%423.5%1058.8%211.8%17
After 2 years at school514.3%2468.6%514.3%12.9%35
After 3 years at school312.0%728.0%1352.0%28.0%25
End of Year 41340.6%1340.6%39.4%39.4%32
End of Year 51338.2%1544.1%617.6%034
End of Year 6410.5%1539.5%1642.1%37.9%38
Maths
Well belowBelowAtAboveTotal
NumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumber
All students2212.2%5530.4%8848.6%168.8%181
Māori2012.0%4929.3%8249.1%169.6%167
Male1215.8%2127.6%3850.0%56.6%76
Female109.5%3432.4%5047.6%1110.5%105
Maths
Well belowBelowAtAboveTotal
NumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumberProportionNumber
After 1 year at school15.9%317.6%1164.7%211.8%17
After 2 years at school25.7%1234.3%1851.4%38.6%35
After 3 years at school14.0%520.0%1768.0%28.0%25
End of Year 4515.6%1237.5%825.0%721.9%32
End of Year 5823.5%1441.2%1029.4%25.9%34
End of Year 6513.2%923.7%2463.2%038

NAG2A Report 2013

NAG2A (b)

Schools are required to report school-level data on National Standards under three headings:


i. School strengths and identified areas for improvement

ii. The basis for identifying areas for improvement

iii. Planned actions for lifting achievement


NAG2A (b)(i) Areas of strength

National Standard subject: Literacy (reading)

Discussion: While our pupils often take some time to achieve in literacy, by the time they are in year 6, their final year, 68.5% of our pupils are “at” or “above” the National Standard for reading.

NAG2A (b)(i) Areas for improvement

National Standard subject: Literacy (reading and writing)

  • While 63% of our year 6 pupils are at expectations in written language our year 4 and 5 pupils need a boost.

  • In reading we also need to be more consistent in providing activities and guidance to improve comprehension as our assessment tends to be dominated by running record accuracy.

NAG2A (b)(ii) Basis for identifying areas for improvement

Discussion:

The 2013 National Standards Report in written langauge told us:

  • 81% of year 4 pupils are either “below” or “well below” expectations.

  • 82% of year 5 pupils are either “below” or “well below” expectations.

  • More boys than girls are “below” or “well below” (74% compared to 55%) particularly in the “well below” category..

  • In 2013 years 4 and 5 fared worse than other year levels. This is the same trend as we found in 2012.

NAG2A (b)(iii) Planned actions for lifting achievement

  • School wide PLD will be provided by Auckland University

  • Walk-throughs will focus on :

    • Modelling books

    • WALTS understood?

    • Books should show progress over the year.

    • Justified grouping takes place

    • Assessment is consistent and reflected in books

  • Assessment will be moderated

  • The school timetable will be adjusted so the 9 – 11 am slot is literacy school wide

  • A school-wide spelling programme will be implemented.

  • eTap results will be more closely analysed to determine exactly what aspect of writing is hampering achievement (e.g. punctuation, impact, spelling?) and activities to focus on them will be sourced and shared.

  • Each class will have a target group whose progress will be monitored.

  • Teachers will share ideas for motivating writers such as topic choice, presentation or incentives.



Charter Consultation Plan

The Kaikohe East School Board consults annually with the Maori community and wider community.   

Processes for consultation include:

    • School Newsletters
    • Parent and Board Meetings
    • Parent-Teacher-Child Hui
    • Whanau meetings
    • Informal dialogue
    • Home visits
    • Open days
    • Curriculum Evenings
    • School Questionnaires and Surveys

Ministry Letter

  • Letter from the Ministry of Education acknowledging receipt of the charter: Link

 


Printing this Charter

  • We think of the environment and have designed this charter to be read as a web page.
  • if you really have to print this charter you will find that there are no page numbers, and some tables will run across pages.