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1704 Te Arahura Achievement Challenge and Plan


Te Arahura Community of Learning

“All students will achieve success through a seamless educational pathway”



Kaikohe Intermediate School

Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Kaikohe

Okaihau College

Kaikohe East School

Horeke School

Northland College

Waima School

Kaikohe Christian School

Umawera School

Mangamuka School

Early Childhood Representatives





“A thing that comes to mind when I hear the word “Achieve” is Strive. Strive to me means to always participate and just try your very best at everything you do”

(Student – Te Ara Hura CoL).

Links to PDF Version of this document: View Download



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CoL Vision:


“All students will achieve success through a seamless educational pathway”



Vision Statement:


  • To create a community of learning where all students are understood, acknowledged and supported as unique, culturally confident, Ngāpuhi centered learners.


  • To support early childhood facilities and schools to be strong agents of change in students lives through deliberate acts of collaboration, and to challenge, support and reward students for their achievements.

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Our Community:

Our Community of Learning (CoL) is located in the Tai Tokerau geographical area bounded by Maungataniwha in the North, the upper reaches of the Hokianga Harbour in the west, the Puketi and Omahuta Forests in the east, and Puhanga-Tohora in the south. Within our geographical area are three main Takiwa (representative group of marae/hapu): Ngāpuhi Hokianga ki Te Raki, Ngāpuhi ki te Hauauru, and Te Ropu Takiwa o Mangakahia (See Diagrams 1 and 2). Our rohe is rich in oral tradition, culture and history.


Diagram 1: Location of schools in the Kaikohe Community of Learning Diagram 2: Takiwa o Te Iwi o Ngāpuhi



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We acknowledge that the majority of our school children, their families and Ngāpuhi are Māori and are of Ngāpuhi descent. A mark of Ngāpuhi is a fierce loyalty to whānau and hapu. The traditional, communal way of life, focused around marae is as strong an aspiration now as in times gone before. (Te Runanga a Iwi o Ngāpuhi).

We acknowledge the low socio-economic status backgrounds significant of the majority of our students, for the influence and effect it has on educational outcomes. In terms of Decile rating, 78% of the schools in our community have a decile 1 rating. Our schools are both rural and urban.

We recognise the diversity of school cultures within our community which is characterised by one Kura Kaupapa Māori School (Years 1-13), one faith based school (Years 1-13), two secondary schools (Years 7-13, and Years 9-13), one intermediate school (Years 7-8), one full primary school (Years 1-8) and four contributing primary schools (Years 1-6). Our schools all have a proud history of education.

We are a group of ten school leaders interconnected in two dominant ways: the generational educational pathways that students ‘walk’ in their school life; and the cultural connections of parents and whānau within and between the communities of each of our schools. Whānau have been attending our schools for generations.  Our shared domain of interest is that all students will achieve success through a seamless educational pathway.

We acknowledge that our work as leaders in the CoL lies in re-culturing each of our organisations as one community, whilst maintaining the uniqueness of each or our educational settings. Some of our schools have experienced recent and/or long periods of struggle and /or sinking school cultures - as defined by Stoll and Fink's (1996) typology of school cultures. Current leaders have shifted school cultures to that where there is a common vision and a keen focus on improving student’s progress and development, both individually and collectively.

Leaders in our CoL are newcomers, Principals with less than five years leadership experience, and those with a long service of experience in managing and leading their schools. The latter have been with their communities of practice for a long time, know the ropes and are seen as competent by their peers.  The diversity of the leadership experience and competencies within this community sets the stage for learning, reciprocity and the social learning system in our community. Our aim as a CoL is to build the disposition for growth, and the capability for ongoing change—in the CoL’s individual members, and the organisations they work in (Bull and Gilbert, 2012).

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Our collective mission statements emphasise the importance we place on community, whānau and family, and environment in and for student learning. Our CoL has identified the following conditions critical to its success:


  • The core business of teaching and learning is effective.

  • Students experience success.

  • All teachers make a difference in student learning and engagement in learning.

  • Students are engaged in learning, know and have choices in what they are learning.

  • Learning contexts and expectations give students opportunities to grow personally, socially, culturally and academically.


We want to grow students who:


  • Are comfortable in their own identity.

  • Know their options.

  • Challenge assumptions and realities.

  • Communicate effectively and are bilterate. They are able to communicate in both English and Te Reo Māori, and have an understanding of the Ngāpuhitanga knowledge and tikanga.

  • Think critically

  • Are active, involved 21st Century citizens.


Placed Based Initiative (Kainga Ora)

The Kaikohe community, which is surrounded by the Te Ara Hura CoL, has been identified as a priority for the implementation of a newly formed community based interagency response to improve outcomes for at-risk children, young people and their families.  The initiative is called the Placed Based Initiative – or Kainga Ora.   The new initiative gives local sector leaders the flexibility and support to collectively tailor responses to what works in their communities. Kainga Ora takes a social investment approach, where knowledge and judgment of local decision makers is combined with national level data and analytics tools to inform a better understanding of local needs and improved targeting of investment. There will be a close link between the Te Ara Hura CoL’s collaborative efforts to raise student achievement, and Kainga Ora in the future.


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Defining a CoL Achievement Challenge and related approaches to accelerate achievement:

The CoL gathered a range of data to define the achievement challenges and related approaches to accelerate achievement across the CoL. The CoL was very clear that they wanted to take an ecological view of the challenges – rather than see them solely on the basis of achievement data.  The range of data that was considered when defining the achievement challenges are shown in diagram 3 below.


Diagram 3: Ecological data sources to inform the development of Achievement Challenges



The CoL agreed that seeking student voice was important in understanding the strengths and challenges of the being a student within the CoL. The CoL spoke to a range of students across the CoL to understand their perspective. This data was considered by professional leaders as they met to define the Achievement Challenges and related approaches.  The student voice data is summarised in appendix 1 below.


The CoL also agreed that gathering and analysing quantitative data from professional leaders across the Col was also important to create a collective view of the challenges, and what they believe will be effective in addressing then. Themes and trends were gleaned from this information and used to shape an understanding of common achievement challenges across the CoL.  This information is found in appendix 2 below.


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Our Achievement Data:


The CoL analysed 2015 achievement data to determine the strengths and development areas of core curriculum subjects that will be addressed through collaboration.  Table 1-3 shows evidence of this analysis:


Table 1. 2015 National Standards achievement data - Kaikohe CoL:



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Table 2. 2015 Nga Whanaketanga achievement data - Kaikohe CoL:



Table 3. 2015 NCEA Level 1 achievement data - Kaikohe CoL:




Achievement Challenges:


By preserving the integrity of each school's context and commitment to raising achievement we aim to:


  • Increase numbers of students who achieve NCEA Level 1 in Year 11 from 58.3% to 85% over a three year period.


  • Increase the number of students who achieve at or above in tuhituhi / writing from 60% (tuhituhi) / 53.4% (writing) to 85% over a three year period.


  • Increase the number of students who achieve at or above in pāngarau / mathematics from 69% (pāngarau) / 55.3% (mathematics) to 85% over a three year period.


We will achieve this by:


  1. Supporting and sustaining professional learning – thinking and acting honestly, collaboratively and critically to grow learning as a CoL

  2. Sustaining home – school partnerships - empowering Ngāpuhi to participate in their child’s education

  3. Supporting and sustaining student transition through the education pathway – all participants in a transition are receptive to a system and process

  4. Supporting and sustaining acknowledgement of success across the CoL learners – systems and processes to celebrate learners achievement success


(Expanded on page 12-16 below)


Key emphasis of our collaboration on the CoL education pathway:


We will strategically focus our collaborative efforts on two simultaneous target areas of the education pathway in order to raise student achievement:


  • Target Area 1: Early Childhood - two years after school


  • Target Area 2: Year 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10

The CoL decided to focus on Target Area 1 - Early Childhood - two years after starting school because of the obvious need to help students achieve a stronger start at school by increasing each child's literate and numerate capital, and engaging Ngāpuhi in this. The CoL wants to share skills and resources across schools to strengthen teacher’s pedagogy and achieve a more consistent approach to raising achievement for students in this aspect of the pathway.


The CoL decided to focus on Target Area 2 - Year 6-10 because it was agreed that if students are not supported to negotiate this transition period well, and build a strong base of literacy and numeracy skills to achieve NCEA level 1 by the end of Year 11, they are more likely to fall out of the education pathway. CoL schools contributing to this phase of the education pathway have agreed to work closely together to share skills and resources, engage in joint PLD, and build stronger relationships across amongst teachers.


Our collaborative approach to raise achievement and initial action points:


As stated on page 11 above, the CoL has identified four key foci to influence and accelerate the achievement of students in NCEA Level 1, Pangarau / Mathematics and Tuhituhi / Writing:


  1. Supporting and sustaining professional learning:


Schools in Te Ara Hura CoL have a strong sense of how effective pedagogies enable success.  Identification of PLD needs will be made in the context of an agreed vision of effective pedagogy.


A collaborative and open approach to building a vision of effective pedagogy will establish a foundation with regards to what quality teaching and learning will look like in this CoL. This vision will provide a framework for consistency to enhance effective teacher practice.


It may also establish a focus for in-school appraisal/performance management consistent with CoL expectations. Within this framework lies the opportunity to leverage off the skills demonstrated by effective teachers for the benefit of others needing support and guidance to grow their own practice.


In Term 1 2017 our first action will be to develop a CoL-wide view of what constitutes ‘effective pedagogy’. The PLD application will be formed on the basis of an agreement about what a quality curriculum would exhibit and enable in Te Arahura.


The PLD application will be based on:


  1. Identifying key PLD needs linked to the Achievement Challenge document

  2. Identifying agreed PLD sharing opportunities

  3. Identifying shared PLD days / times across schools

  4. Identifying cross school release to observe / learn new practices in other schools.

  5. Identifying best fit PLD deliverers


  1. Sustaining Home and School Partnerships:


Whanaungatanga is the cornerstone of relationship for students within schools and across communities, with addition of consistently high expectations from all parties involved to strengthen the learner’s capacity to achieve accelerated achievement gains.


As a CoL we believe that to foster, support and grow this valuable relationship there must be:

  • a productive and positive environment

  • trust – welcoming, accessible and open

  • honesty – learning must be visible and shared

  • respect – value input, support, guidance and prior learning

  • appreciation – of culture, values, participation and decisions

  • inclusion – participation of learning events, data presentation, support with outside agencies


Fostering and developing the home / school partnership will look different in every school community and how it is instigated will follow a different path - but the end result must always be the same and therefore benefit each learner.  To build or enhance existing home and school partnerships Te Ara Hura CoL will develop a practice framework that incorporates agreed strategies to address each of the ‘engagement enablers identified in the research. It will be important to gain an understanding as to what each of these areas entails in order to ensure consistency across the CoL.  The concept of alignment might embrace a mutual understanding of the importance of routines in the home environment as families support learning programmes.  It is intended that a successful approach will be designed to foster the development of fully engaged teachers, parents and whānau with a collective understanding of NZ curriculum and related assessment processes.


An initial recommendation across the CoL would be that contact with whānau be initiated after key assessment phases are completed, and goals for improvement co-constructed between school and whanau. A recommended cycle of assessment, conversations and goal setting would be:


  • On entry at 5 years, 5 ½ years, 6 and 7 observational survey and JAM used to ascertain students levels and shared in a one to one conversation with whānau.

  • In between these official data collection points other forms of formative assessment are used to ascertain students learning levels.

  • After 5 year data collection whānau are invited or a home visit is arranged to discuss the assessment format and assessment results. At this time the whānau and school set the student future learning goals and resources to support this are given to the whānau to support the learners and siblings at home.

  • At year 3 meeting introduce parents to the new testing that the child will encounter i.e. STAR, PAT, RROBE GLOSS so that they are familiar.

  • Year 3-8 Goal setting meetings and data sharing is done twice yearly.

  • During the child’s learning at our schools it is paramount that we get 100% whānau turnout and participation. This may require making home visits at a time that suits our whānau.


  1. Supporting and sustaining student transition through the education pathway:


Transition is part of life. Transitions occur frequently for our students during their lifetime. These will include everyday transitions (physical, emotional, intellectual) ranging across age groups within schools, to social environments, and changing school communities.


As CoL schools we must realise that in order to ensure the greatest level of success for students, attention must be given to supporting students and whānau/families through various transitions both educationally, physically and emotionally.  Hauora and wellbeing are also important factors of successful transitioning. The more successful the transition for a child, the more prepared our akonga are for their new environments.


A successful and effective transition program is everybody’s responsibility. Schools in this CoL will take the lead in evaluating the needs of their students and families, assessing where their current teaching and learning programmes and services have gaps, and then building a stakeholder/community strategy to implement transition programs at various levels. It is important to plan early to allow time for changes and have a support alternative because even the most carefully thought out transition plans can go wrong.


Students do best when all key players collaborate to continually support the students’ needs through transition stages and beyond. Developmentally appropriate supports and services must be the cornerstone of transition programs.  Strong parental involvement with a broad base of well-coordinated and creative use of community resources is also important. Remaining culturally sensitive to the needs of families and students can facilitate communication throughout the process and help build partnerships between the school, families, and the community.


As a CoL we believe there are five key aspects of effective transition that promote achievement gains for our students:


  1. Understanding effective education transitions

  2. Preparing for effective transitions

  3. Support for vulnerable students

  4. Using effective transition processes

  5. Providing a responsive curriculum


To ensure effective transitions for our students in 2017 and beyond we plan to:


  • Share positive experiences and outcomes of successful transitioning programmes and develop protocols for transition through the education pathway - Early Childhood to Tertiary

  • Understand the key challenges that our akonga face during transition stages

  • Ensuring transitioning days are prioritised in school calendars

  • Each EC centre and school will develop ‘toa’ graduate profile (eg. Each Pou area - Mauri Tu, Mauri Toa, Mauri Ora). Through this profile parent/whānau feedback and feed forward will be captured regarding the outcomes they would like to see built into each profile.


  1. Supporting and sustaining acknowledgement of success across the CoL learners


There are many high achievers in the Te Arahura CoL but these people are often not fully recognised for their success – and therefore the opportunity to motivate others to strive for success from their experiences is minimized or lost.  


The CoL will put in place a collective set of systems and processes to ensure students and teachers from this group of Early Childhood providers and schools receive regular and meaningful acknowledgement for achievements gained.  The CoL believes this aspect of the collaborative approach is key to establishing a profile of striving for success across the social network – regularly injecting messages of hope, strength, positivity and accomplishment for all.



The following ideas are suggested for implementation in 2017 and beyond:


  • Develop a COL website to share key strategies and events, and provide a place to post photos and narratives about success stories

  • Develop a communication plan to strategically link success stories to local and national media

  • The communication plan can also take into account messaging strategies through School/Kura newsletters and websites

  • Consider specific presentations/speakers at CoL hui (students and teachers)

  • Ensure success stories are displayed on visual boards in each school/kura - a designated space

  • COL to consider offering scholarships to all schools/kura within the community

  • Recognition for successful students in each school/kura presented at a COL hui (start / mid / end of year)

  • Develop a CoL mentoring programme for aspiring leaders across age groups



Our Targets


Through collaboration we aim to increase numbers of students who achieve NCEA Level 1 in Year 11 from 58.3% to 85% over a three year period (participation based).


Table 4 Student achieving Level 1 NCEA in Year 11 - and related CoL targets



Number

%

Actual 2015

105 of 180

58.3

2017 Target

121 of 180

67.7 (+8.9%)

2018 Target

137 of 180

76.1 (+8.9%)

2019 Target

153 of 180

85

Evidence used to assess targets


NCEA results


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Through collaboration we aim to increase the number of students who achieve Manawa Toa / Manawa Ora in NWRM pāngarau from 69% to 85% over a three year period


Table 5. Student achievement pāngarau - and related CoL targets


Pāngarau

Year 1-8


Students achieving Manawa Toa / Manawa Ora in NWRM (Tau / Ine / Tauanga)


Number

%

Actual 2016

Tau

124 of 141

88%

Ine

59 of 141

42%

Tauanga

60 of 141

43%

2017 Target

Tau

On Target

On Target

Ine

78 of 141

56%

Tauanga

80 of 141

57%

2018 Target

Tau

On Target

On Target

Ine

98 of 141

70.3%

Tauanga

100 of 141

71%

2019 Target

Tau

On Target

On Target

Ine

119 of 141

85%

Tauanga

119 of 141

85%

Evidence used to assess targets


Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori data


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Through collaboration we aim to increase the number of students who achieve at or above in National Standards mathematics from 55.3% 85% over a three year period.


Table 6. Student achievement mathematics - and related CoL targets


Mathematics

Year 1-8

Year

Students achieving at or above in National Standards


Number

%

Actual 2015

343 of 620

55.3

2017 Target

404 of 620

65.2

2018 Target

466 of 620

75.1

2019 Target

527 of 620

85

Evidence used to assess targets


National Standards Data


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Through collaboration we aim to increase the number of students who achieve Manawa Toa / Manawa Ora in NWRM tuhituhi from 60% to 85% over a three year period


Table 7. Student achievement in tuhituhi - and related CoL targets


Tuhituhi

Year 1-8


Students achieving Manawa Toa / Manawa Ora in NWRM


Number

%

Actual 2015

80 of 133

60.2

2017 Target

90 of 133

68.4

2018 Target

101 of 133

76.6

2019 Target

113 of 133

85

Evidence used to assess targets


Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori data


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Table 8. Student achievement in writing - and related CoL targets


Through collaboration we aim to increase the number of students who achieve at or above in National Standards writing from 53.4% to 85% over a three year period


Writing

Year 1-8


Students achieving at or above in National Standards


Number

%

Actual 2015

331 of 620

53.4

2017 Target

396 of 620

63.9

2018 Target

461 of 620

74.4

2019 Target

527 of 620

85

Evidence used to assess targets


National Standards Data


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Table 9. Number and percentage of students targeted for improvement across CoL - pangarau / mathematics and tuhituhi / writing in Year 1-8 in 2017


2017

Pangarau

Mathematics

Tuhituhi

Writing


School Name


Number aki  or taki

(Tau / Ine / Tauanga)


Number below or well below


Number aki  or taki


Number below or well below

Waima School


22


23

Mangamuka School


8


10

Horeke School


14


18

Umawera School


10


12

Kaikohe East School


135


169

TKKM o

Kaikohe

T

124

I

59

H

60


65


Kaikohe Intermediate


75


72

Kaikohe Christian Sch


25


29

Okaihau College


78


91


Total:


124


59


60

367

65

424


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Table 10. Number and percentage of students in CoL targeted for improvement in 2017 - pangarau / mathematics and tuhituhi / writing in Year 9-10


2017

Pangarau

Mathematics

Tuhituhi

Writing


School Name


Number aki  or taki


Number below or well below


Number aki or taki


Number below or well below

Northland College


79


78

Kaikohe Christian


9


9

Okaihau College


54


58


Total:


142


145


.


Table 11. Number and percentage of Year 11 students from CoL school targeted for improvement in 2017 in NCEA Level 1




2017


School Name


Number

TKKM o Kaikohe

1

Northland College

31

Kaikohe Christian

4

Okaihau College

17


Total:

53


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Memorandum of Understanding



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Definition of terms:


  • CoL: Education facilities formally approved to join a CoL by the Minister of Education


  • CoL members: Staff, students, Ngāpuhi and community linked to a CoL by an education facility


  • Professional Leadership Group: Education leaders from education facilities formally linked to a CoL


  • CoL Governance / Stewardship Group: Representation of staff, students, Ngāpuhi and community in a CoL


  • Achievement Challenge: A strategic plan to raise student achievement in the CoL


Review:


The MOU has been agreed by all parties as of 31 August 2016 – the MOU will be reviewed bi-annually as of the date it was agreed.

References:


Bull, A., & Gilbert, J. (2012). Swimming out of our depth? Leading learning in 21st century schools. New Zealand Council for Educational Research.


Stoll, L., & Fink, D. (1996). Changing our schools: Linking school effectiveness and school improvement. Open University Press.



Appendices:


1)  Kaikohe Community of Learning – Student Voice Analysis


General Question





Question One



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Question Two







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Question Three




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Question Four






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Question Five



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